How A Task-Analysis Mindset Improves the Design Process

Defining tasks when you are evaluating and planning a project can help you:

  • Understand the scope of the project
  • Determine the component parts of the solution
  • Organize the development process

Whether you a contractor or permanent designer, we all need to be able to present the scope of a project and the resources needed to stakeholders and being an expert at task analysis will help you achieve that.

Let’s start by the review of what a task is. A task is a piece of work that needs to be accomplished as a part of a job. Tasks are made up of steps that need to be taken to complete the task. Sometimes these steps are a task themselves, often referred to as a subtask. The idea is to break down job tasks to their smallest components to fully understand what a person needs to understand or accomplish in order to do the job.

Understanding the Scope of the Project

One of the great things about being task-analysis minded is that it helps you to develop questions to ask to define the project. In order to be able to break down the goals of the project into specific tasks you need to understand:

  • The processes or attitudes that learners need to adopt
  • Who the learners are and what their background knowledge is
  • What the measure of success will be

Considering these as you interview the SME or clients for the project and listening for the answers in terms of the tasks will help make sure you probe for the information you to fully understand the scope of the project. This may not all happen in in one conversation but over time.

When you are task-minded, you start by looking for an understanding of each task. This means breaking down the goals of the project to the task steps that fit the audience. By doing this you outline the full scope of the project, which helps you determine necessary resources, and helps you present this to the stakeholder or client.

Determining the Component Parts of the Solution

When you are thinking from a task perspective, it is easy to take the scope of the project and group it into like chunks that will go together. Understanding these tasks or groups of tasks, you can easily evaluate which ones are best resolved as training, what is best served with a job aid, or what can be resolved with an environmental change or other performance improvement solution. The task-analysis mindset helps you to quickly see the pieces and start to see how the solution can go together to best leverage the advantages of different types of solutions.

Organize the Development Process

Once you have identified the tasks and the solutions to be used, it is easy to prioritize the development process and allocate resources appropriately. If you are the sole person doing the project, you can easily determine the order that development needs to happen for the different tasks and make sure that it lays out efficiently and those pieces that could get stalled later are done first or those things that might change as the project progresses are done later so as not to do them.

What is Your Sweet Spot?

In a recent conversation, I was asked this question and as I reflected on it, I recognized how important it is to understand your sweet spot. These are the things which are the magic of your job, where you get the maximum impact for your effort. They feel natural, easy and have you feeling on top of the world, whether these are specific tasks or accomplishments, or they relate to the your work environment. Most often you will find these at the intersection of your passion, skills, and values. Knowing what these are and making sure they are a regular part of your day will help you find joy at work as discussed in a previous post.

Let me share with you a few of mine:

  • eLearning Development – I enjoy the entire design process but for me there is something about the actual development of an eLearning module that is magical. It is the perfect blend of problem solving, artistry, and technical expertise. When I get to this part of the process, I get very focused and in the zone. I enjoy problem solving of figuring out how to make accomplish difficult interactions, and blending my expertise with the development software with an artistic eye to bring together an effective course. When I finish, I am excited to put the course in front of learners, but sad that the development phase is over.
  • Learner’s Excitement – Nothing puts me on the mountaintop quite like talking to participants in a training session and hearing what they learned and their excitement to put it into use. As soon as I get that feedback, whatever it took to prepare and present the session, whatever challenges presented themselves, they just all melt away. Learner excitement is contagious and I love to catch it with them. As an instructional designer, I am selling new ideas, understandings, and a different way of looking at things, and when learner not only get’s it but is also excited about it, it is magic.
  • Co-worker Connection – Have you ever had that moment in a meeting when you look at a co-worker and you can each tell exactly what the other is thinking and understand the situation with just a glance? If you have experienced that, then you probably understand another of my sweet spots. This isn’t something that happens overnight but comes from working with someone over time where both people have taken the time to know and understand the other. This typically is a symptom of a comfortable environment where sharing of ideas and asking questions is encouraged. Just being easily understood and understanding others can be the magic that takes a team or company to excellence.
  • World/Community Impact – Some people want to individually have a huge impact on the world, but for me, I want to be a part of an organization that makes a valuable impact. This means different things to different people, but for me, there is magic when my employer is innovative and is pushing the world forward in positive directions. This could be in serving a neglected population and changing their lives, impacting whole communities with environmental/health measures or pushing forward technology to bring about new discoveries.

If you have never thought about your sweet spots, I encourage you to reflect on what you do and what moments come forward as being highs. Look for the patterns in these to identify the tasks, accomplishments, and environmental factors that are a part of your magic.

To learn more about this, check out these resources:

12 Days of Best Practices

In honor of the holiday season, I want to share 12 Best practices from a variety of resources. Some are generic to all learning and development and some target specific areas. Please feel free to add your own Best Practices in the comments below.

Delivered via a multi-media approach – using a blend of delivery methods to suit learning preferences and learner’s needs.

From Roberta Gagos on the eLearning Industry

Different media and types of training allow us to leverage different advantages. Bring together several strategies to create a well-rounded (like our friend Santa) approach.

In total: high-impact L&D professionals need to continuously train themselves.

From Bersin by Deloitte

In the modern world, things are always changing and if you want to continue to compete in the market place, learning and development programs need to be evolving to deal with an evolving workforce.

Learning by doing and establishing shared accountability.

From Mark Thomas on Training Industry

It is important to bring learners into the process. Let them help determine training goals, learn by doing tasks, and encourage them to have accountability.

Recognize the importance of veterans in your ranks.

From Workforce.com

Our veteran employees represent a wealth of knowledge. It is key to leverage and capture that knowledge to pass on the newer employees to stay on a flight path of growing success.

70:20:10—a blend formula

From Kineo

When creating blended learning, remember that research shows that 70 percent of learning occurs on the job, 20 percent from other people (social learning) and 10 percent from formal training classes. Keep this in mind when designing a blended learning program.

Begin early

From Emily Bates on The Evolllution

Training should begin from the moment an employee is hired. You want to immerse them in the company culture and establish a culture of learning.

Adults are Just-in-Time Learners

From Frontline Learning

Adult learners gravitate and retain learning that is relevant to their current situation. It is important to tie learning into current needs and make sure learners understand what is in it for them.

In gamification: Use a story context

From Karl Kapp on ATD

When implementing gamification, a story context is a powerful motivator and gives the participant a reason to interact with your content.

For Development: Code (or courses) should be written to be reviewed.

From TutorialsPoint

If you are a developer, course and code should be written so that developers in the future can easily open up the course/code files and understand what is going on and be able to make revisions.

In Virtual Classrooms: Engage People Often

From Randah McKinnie on eLearning Guild

When you deliver virtually, you lose the ability to communicate through body language. Therefore, you need to pump up the engagement. Incorporate activities that will require the learner to actively engage in the session. Use polls, ask questions, involve them in annotating solutions on whiteboard slides.

For Succesion Planning: Assess performance and potential

From Dan McCarthy on IvyExec

When thinking about employees and their future, don’t just rely on past performance. You need to develop strategies for assessing their potential as well. Just because someone is an excellent salesperson, does not mean they will make an excellent sales manager. You need to determine where their potential lies.

Performance Improvement: Training is not always the best solution.

From James Simers

As learning and development professionals, we need to analyze a situation to determine the most effective solution. The best solution may be a job aid for a task that is complex and done infrequently, it may be a change to the environment that will resolve the issue or any of a number of performance improvement strategies. Don’t start with the assumption that you need to develop a training class and make sure you have selected the best solution to the problem.

I wish you all a peaceful and blessed season as you celebrate life, love, and family!

Set Impossible Goals and Achieve Innovative Change

Do you want to have impact? Achieve big changes for your company or industry? You need to set an impossible goal.

How Do I Set an Impossible Goal?

optimistic thinkingThere are two keys to setting an impossible goal, empathy and optimistic thinking. Both of these need to be done in a place that is beyond your comfort zone and fall into the extremes of your thinking. Empathy is what will help you feel the pain of the struggles of the problem you want to solve. You need to be able to dig deep into the problem and understand it and feel the pain of it. With that passion for the problem, you next rely on your optimistic thinking. This lets you dream big to brainstorm solutions and believe they are possible. Use this to set your impossible goal.

This thinking is what will breed innovation and change. If you can engage in this thinking as a part of a team, you will be able to harness the different strengths across the team to optimize your ideas and solutions. To learn more about developing a team click here.

How Do I Achieve the Impossible

While the brainstorming happened in the extremes of your thinking, the planning needs to move towards your comfort zone of thinking. You need to start by considering the solution(s) from a perspective of being possible. Analyze the solution and figure out how to make it happen. Now you may not be able to come up with a way to make the solution happen in its current state but this will help you find parts of it that are possible or see places where it is possible if you scale something down. As you discover these possibilities, spend more time fleshing out the goal and set measurable objectives.

Now you want to move to the middle of your comfort zone and plan how you will achieve the goal and objectives. At this point, you want to be realistic about your resources and time. Taking these into account, layout specific plans to achieve the goal. At this point find a way to step away from you optimistic thinking and come up with everything that can go wrong. Identify potential obstacles and develop contingencies to meet them.

Present these plans to people who were not a part of the brainstorming and goal design. These may be stakeholders, company leaders, clients, depending on the situation. Get a sense of their buy-in. This process provides a “reality check” and makes sure that the plans to achieve the goal are realistic given the resources and time schedule you have. If necessary, adjust the plans to make sure you have the necessary buy-in and support.

Now it is time to put things in motion. Throw all the passion that you had in the brainstorming phase into the implementation and take the steps necessary to implement the plans you have set. If you have done a god job presenting your plan and getting buy-in others will be throwing their passion alongside of yours. And the result…you create change and innovation.

Remember to find the problems and to brainstorm outside of your thinking comfort zone and then do your actual planning and implementation based in realistic thinking.

Interested in learning more? Check out these links.

Does Training Need to be Concerned about Diversity?

A couple of months back, our department was updating a photo on the dashboard of our LMS. Our company is over 80% white males but the previous picture included a mixture of males and females both white and Latino that showed more diversity that the company. While discussions were going on, my boss paid a visit to a branch and ran into some new employees that were just getting into our LMS for the first time. Interestingly one of them noticed the picture and commented that while it showed diversity, there was no one “like him”. This was a great reminder that an understanding and use of diversity is important to training, just as it is to all areas of a business.

Employees want to feel connected. Employees want to see people who are “like them” when they go through, training courses and materials. Seeing other people like them help them feel more connected to the company.

Empowering a diverse workforce also can develop creativity and innovation. Honoring diversity develops an openness to others and differences which leads to idea sharing, new ways of thinking and innovation which is a business advantage.

Building a diverse workforce helps the company connect with a diverse client base. Just as employees are drawn to training that involves people “like them”, customers are also drawn to a workforce that has people “like them”. Building up this diversity can increase your client base and build your bottom line.

The conversation we had about what picture to use on the dashboard of our LMS was an important one, one that can have consequences that are company wide. A picture that may just make one employee feel more connected can lead to so much more. What conversations are you having about diversity in your training department?

Looking for more information, check out these resources:

Feeling Down? Reclaim Your Joy at Work

Most people have experience a season when they were not satisfied at work. Maybe it is caused by a project you are not excited about, a co-worker that is difficult or possibly your general health is down. Regardless of what it is, the result is lower job satisfaction and a lack of joy at work which become a downward cycle. No one wants to stay in this place, so here are some strategies to turn that situation around and reclaim your joy.

  • Discard the “Grass is always Greener” view

One of the things that can steal our job joy is looking out at other jobs or situations and thinking the grass in greener elsewhere. There may be some truth to that but remember that every job and company has its issues. It is important to remind yourself of that and focus on what is, not what isn’t. If you can do that, you will have already taken the first step to reclaiming your joy. You will also be able to identify what is taking away your joy which allows you to better achieve success in turning it around. As you look at those things, you can then determine, what is temporary, what is possible to change, and what you will continue to exist and you will need to work with.

  • Make a change at work

When you have identified those things which are issues at work, see what you can do to change them. If there is an environmental issue such as the office temperature, or space configuration, see if it is possible to make a change. If the issue is one of duties, maybe there is a duty you wish you didn’t have or one you wish you did, talk to your supervisor to see there is a possibility to either gain more experience in the duty you want or trade duties with someone to reduce the task that is frustrating. Not every manager will be open to conversations such as these but a good manager recognizes the benefits of a happy employee and if there are changes within their power to make, a good manager will work with you.

  • Find a professional growth activity

As Albert Einstein said, “The day you stop learning, you start dying.” We all need to be learning and growing and being active in professional growth can help recapture your joy at work. Maybe the opportunity is at or through work but there are many opportunities for professional growth outside of work. In the Learning and Development industry, you may look for a local chapter of the Association for Talent Development (ATD) or the International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI). These are just two of the many great organizations that have opportunities for professional growth through local meetings, online webinars, and research papers.

  • Do something to affirm a co-worker

One of the great ways to find joy is to give it. There are lots of ways to affirm another employee but consider writing a handwritten note to another employee recognizing their strengths and how they impact your work or environment at the company. Douglas Conant, former CEO of Cambell’s made it a practice to write handwritten notes to employees every week as a part of developing a new culture that turned the company around. Just doing something positive that benefits a coworker will help you focus on the positives of that person and reclaim joy.

  • Identify ways that you make an impact

As a part of reclaiming your joy at work, make a list of the activities where you have made an impact at work. This may be specific projects you worked on that were successful, people that you helped or trained to be more effective, or ideas that you have contributed to help the company as a whole. As you make this list, you are affirming yourself and taking away the power of other things and people to take away your joy.

These five strategies will help you reclaim your joy at work. Things will never be perfect, but they will be better. And if for some reason you decide that you need to make a job change, each of these activities will have helped you with that process as well, from trying to work with your current employer to resolve the issue, networking through professional development, making sure when you leave you have left a good impression and left on good terms, and identifying those strengths that you have to offer your future employer.

Looking for some more information on these ideas, check out some of these links:

Build a Team for Success

Whether you are building a project team, a department, or starting a new business venture, building the right team is essential to success. Ultimately, you are building a team that will be able to create and influence opportunities, a team that will have a global view and yet be able to focus on details. The beauty of a team is that you don’t have to have all of these things in one person, but in the combination of people you bring together.

So what are you looking for in a team?

  • Shared Passion – You need to bring together people who share a passion for the goal to be accomplished. This might be a project team that will be visioning and developing a company enterprise system and you want to bring together people who have a passion for connecting people, developing culture, and bringing together resources to increase productivity. This might be building a Talent Development department and you want to bring together people who are passionate about helping people improve their performance. Regardless of the purpose of the team, you want to find people who have a passion for the goals.
  • Strengths – You need to find people who have honed their strengths. If the goal is to move things forward, you need people who have identified their strength(s) and are honing them. These people bring not only that strength to the table but experience and commitment to developing expertise. If you want to create an opportunity, you need people who have a demonstrated ability to set goals and achieve them. Ideally, the strengths people bring will relate to the goals to be achieved or the perceived tasks that will be necessary but don’t discount a person with strengths in a different area. You may find that the unrelated strength becomes the seed for innovation.
  • Differences – You need to bring together people who are different. Bringing together different people will help the team to better identify patterns and see the systems that are relevant to the goals of the team. On a project team, you need to include stakeholders in addition to team members that are expected to drive implementation.

Why is this important?

When you build you team based on passion, strengths and differences, you are setting yourself up to identify the different systems you will encounter, the roadblocks to the goals, and the solutions to drive success.

Developing a team that can see the forest and the individual trees is developing a team that will be able to both vision and implement. This team will be able to see the interconnectedness of the company and who will be impacted by a project and how that impact will play out. A team that represents differences will more successfully identify the fundamental issues and forces that come into play and how they relate to one another. If you can identify these and represent them together, you will be able to see the system(s) at work and identify roadblocks to your goals and identify the places of influence.

Launching a new program such as a new induction training program to a company is going to face roadblocks. You need to be able to understand all the ways this new program will interact with the company. This may interact with how employees spend their time, what goals it helps them achieve, company culture, just to name a few. With that understanding of where it connects, you can identify the roadblocks, whether they are environmental or attitudinal. Looking at the system of implementation and roadblocks, you then are able to identify points of influence and see how you can strategically manage those to optimize success.

Bringing together a team with passion is a team that will have the dedication to persist to success. Bringing together a team of people with strengths means that those people will have credibility and can be influences. Bringing together a team of differences means that the team will be able to identify the fundamental parts of the systems involved, the potential roadblocks, see where the points of influences and have the foundation for innovation.

In addition to my experiences this post was inspired by two recent talks I heard. One was given by Dr. Carol Ann Sharicz on Systems Thinking 101 given at a local chapter ISPI meeting and the other is a TED Talk called Be an Opportunity Maker given by Kare Anderson.

Put your Participant First in End-of-session Polls

How many times have you answered feedback questions at the end of a webinar you have attended? Did you ever get any personal benefit from the poll?

Many feedback polls only collect feedback data, which is helpful to the facilitator and the stakeholders that requested the training the best polls benefit the participants as well. If you want to create an effective poll that provides benefit for both you and the participants, include questions that provide:

  • Concept Reinforcement
  • Audience Awareness
  • Feedback

Concept Reinforcement

Devoting one or two questions to concept reinforcement can really help both your audience and you. Even a question as open ended as, list three things you learned today, can be powerful. For your audience, the simple act of listing them down acts as reinforcement and demonstrates the main points of what they received or the pieces of information that were most notable to them. For you, you learn what stuck with them and can compare it to your goals and objectives to determine if you need to modify your presentation or activities to better communicate information.

Audience Awareness

Strategically asking a question about available resources or ideas help build up awareness for them. For instance, after we launched our new LMS, we asked a multi-select question about which types of resources the participant had used in the LMS. The question alone made them more aware of the different types of training resources at their disposal. Some participants were already aware, others started asking questions about these different resources and still others further explored the LMS on their own to discover these resources. While the data was valuable to us to understand the usage of our LMS, the goal of the question was to build awareness and encourage company employees to use all the resources of the LMS.

Feedback

These are the question that are designed to fuel your improvement for future webinars. Feedback questions need to go beyond ratings of the facilitator and the information, although these are valid questions and can be helpful, but need to include open-ended questions that invite open and honest feedback. These can include questions about what was most helpful? Least helpful? And what questions/information they wish had been a part of the webinar. These kinds of open ended questions will best provide you paths to improve and offers you the opportunity to respond to them if necessary/appropriate.

When you build your next feedback poll, think about your questions and make sure you are getting the most out of the poll. Don’t just get feedback information, but build reinforcement and audience awareness into your poll. Make sure that the poll is not just about benefiting you, but also your participants.

Interested in more resources about crafting good feedback questions? Check out these other blog posts:

Evaluation Cards – Use them to quickly improve your presentation skills

What’s the Best Webinar Polling Question Ever?

Why the Former Teacher May be Your Next Star Employee – Part II

In last week’s Part One post, we started looking at how the skills of former school teachers transfers to the Core Competency Model™ put forth by ATD and common job description skills. In that vein let’s continue to look at those.

Managing Learning Programs

  • Provide vision and strategies for learning program design
  • Provide project management for learning projects
  • Manage outside resources
Public school teachers are given a framework for what learners need to accomplish by the end of the year, but from their, they provide the vision and work out the strategies to achieve those goals and make their vision come to fruition. On top of this, teachers are working with a diverse population and manageing the learning programs for each learner they work with. They manage other school resources, parents and school volunteers, and other outside learning resources such as field trips, SMEs that they bring into their classroom, and learning competitions that their students compete in. Just putting together a field trip is an example of their project management skills. They deal with volunteer resources, budgeting for the trip, managing transportation and determining the content that will be delivered and how it will be structured. This can also involve the creation of other materials to supplement or extend the learning from the field trip experience.

 

Coaching

  • Coach employees to improve job performance
Teachers are involved in coaching students, parents, and future teachers. Teachers constantly work with students to engage them in examining their learning progress and establish goals. They review these goals and provide accountability for the student. Many parents are looking to teachers for ways to help and support their children and teachers coach them through this and help them understand their child and their child’s needs and work with them so that parents can determine the best strategies for helping their child. This can be coaching parents in how to help with homework, or how to question their child while reading together or how to oversee their child’s project. Additionally, many teacher have taken on the role of being a mentor teacher to a colleague or a student teacher. This is a very formal coaching experience that the teacher provides and is formally assessed by the school district or a local college.

 

Knowledge Management

  • Develop a culture of learning
  • Facilitate collaboration and social learning
A classroom community has a culture of learning and the teacher is right in the middle of it. The utilize strategies to bring together learners to work on projects and learn from one another. Teachers leverage a variety of resources, identifying the sources of knowledge and bringing students together with the necessary knowledge. They foster curiosity and a love of knowledge by engaging learners and helping them see the benefits of growing and learning together. Teachers act as facilitators, moderators, and social directors for their classroom and understand how to leverage these to promote optimal learning success.

 

Performance Improvement

  • Evaluate training needs
  • Design and develop training materials
  • Implement performance solutions
These days every teacher has at least one student with special needs, whether they are gifted or receiving educational support services. These are the students where a teacher applies more than just instruction, but brings their performance improvement skills into play. They need to take the extra time to understand the special learning needs for this student and determine what solution will best help them to excel. This might be a technology aid solution, involving them in a mentorship program, or modifying their environment to increase success. Teachers are not just designing instruction and facilitating it, but they are working with the whole learner and determining and implementing performance solutions that go beyond training the learner.

 

Because teachers are in charge of a small community, they end up involving themselves with all aspects of training and development. In addition to being the instructional designer and trainer, they also serve as the project manager for classroom events and project (and sometimes school-wide initiatives), the coach for anyone they bring into the learning community, and the person who looks at all aspects of a skill deficit and not only reaches out to training, but utilizes a toolbox of performance improvement techniques. While the teacher may less familiar with corporate culture, that is easily learned and the wealth of skills they bring to the table mean that the former teacher is primed to be a superstar in the learning and development world. Instead of hesitating, companies should embrace the former teacher and leverage the wealth of abilities they have to offer.

Some Advice for Teachers Looking to Transition

Like I said in the beginning of last week’s post, the key for the transitioning teacher is to effectively communicate their skills in corporate language. The Core Competency Model is a great place to start to understand how the corporate world talks about learning and development. Adopt the terms and framing when marketing yourself through your resume, cover letter, and during interviews. Being able to talk like a corporate instructional designer will demonstrate that you have done your research on the field you are transitioning to and allow you to communicate the vast array of skills you have to offer that will enhance the potential employers company and improve their bottom line. You can make the transition and you will find the employer that has the vision and insight to hire you, their next superstar!

Looking for more information about becoming an instructional designer, check out these other posts:

How to Become an Instructional Designer

Getting into Instructional Design

 

 

Why the Former Teacher May be Your Next Star Employee – Part I

I recently responded to a post from a person looking for advice on how to transfer from public education into corporate training because she was running into obstacles from potential employers. As someone who made the same transition, I related to her struggles. Many people in the corporate world do not see the connection between the role of a public school teacher and a corporate instructional designer/trainer and discount that experience.

My advice included understanding the way corporate jobs are framed and the terms used in describing the skills needed for a position and to frame her experience in that same way to help potential employers see how the skills are relevant.

Over the next two posts we will look at 8 of the 10 competencies in the Core Competency Model™ from ATD and job skills listed in corporate job descriptions to see why the former teacher might be your future star employee.

 

Instructional Design

  • Evaluate training needs
  • Design and develop training materials
Public school teachers are constantly designing learning activities for their students. Curricula do not provide all the materials and a good teacher is constantly tailoring activities for different learners. They evaluate existing materials and modify to meet learner needs. This is continuously evolving as the teacher evaluates the needs of their class as a whole and individual students. A good teacher is balancing these needs and differentiating instruction for the different needs present in their classroom. Teachers also engage in formal evaluation of learners through regular report cards which are a mix of concrete data and subjective assessment based on contact with the learner.

 

Training Delivery

  • Conduct classroom and virtual training sessions
Facilitation is a core role of a classroom teacher. They are constantly standing in front of learners and delivering material. They also know how to manage groups of learners that are involved in a series of different activities. They are quite accomplished at working with one group or monitoring their activity while making sure that other groups of learners are engaged in their own learning. Teachers are masters of engagement and understand the role entertainment takes in good facilitation.

 

Learning Technologies

  • Experience with Captivate, Storyline, Lectora, and Microsoft applications
  • Design and develp eLearning modules
  • Experience with a LMS
Many teachers use a lot of technology in their classrooms. They may not have specifically used rapid design software, but have used other products such as Hyperstudio, iMovie, or web-based product to design or deliver learning activities. In my days as a teacher, I taught thinking skills and basic computing through the use of RoboLab, communication skills by teaching the students to capture, edit, and produce video to create public service announcements, and a variety of tools to create eLearning modules that guided learners to explore a topic and develop a variety of skills. Additionally, in today’s classroom, a teacher may have experience with a LMS such as Moodle or others. Teachers today can be very tech savvy and even if they don’t know the specific software program you use, they have likely used something similar.

 

Evaluating Learning Impact

  • Use metrics to evaluate learning programs
Teachers use a lot of data when measuring learning and students. They have data from classroom assessments which allow the teacher to evaluate specific students and identify issues with the instructional materials. Teachers also receives data from standardized tests which lets the teacher look at their students in relation to a greater population of learners. Additionally, the teacher has subjective data that has been collected as a part of individual coaching of a learner. Teachers are a great deal of experience working with and effectively using metrics to improve learning.

As you look at these four competencies, you can see that former teachers bring extensive experience designing and facilitating instruction. They have worked with a variety of metric, both creating the assessment to capture metric but also working with metrics that have been collected by other sources. Former teachers can also have extensive technology knowledge and while they may not have worked with the exact programs you want them to utilize, they have likely worked with very similar software technologies and may have used some technology that would be a great addition to your departments toolbox.

For myself, I was a huge technology enthusiast and was always looking at ways to use technology as one of the ways to best achieve the goals and objectives for my students. My love of technology and comfort with it led me down a path of designing and developing eLearning. While that is just one of my job functions, currently it is a focus and it is my roots in technology from my teaching experience that led to my success today.

Check back next week for part two of this series where we will look at four more of the competencies outlined by the ATD.