Why the Former Teacher May be Your Next Star Employee – Part I

I recently responded to a post from a person looking for advice on how to transfer from public education into corporate training because she was running into obstacles from potential employers. As someone who made the same transition, I related to her struggles. Many people in the corporate world do not see the connection between the role of a public school teacher and a corporate instructional designer/trainer and discount that experience.

My advice included understanding the way corporate jobs are framed and the terms used in describing the skills needed for a position and to frame her experience in that same way to help potential employers see how the skills are relevant.

Over the next two posts we will look at 8 of the 10 competencies in the Core Competency Model™ from ATD and job skills listed in corporate job descriptions to see why the former teacher might be your future star employee.

 

Instructional Design

  • Evaluate training needs
  • Design and develop training materials
Public school teachers are constantly designing learning activities for their students. Curricula do not provide all the materials and a good teacher is constantly tailoring activities for different learners. They evaluate existing materials and modify to meet learner needs. This is continuously evolving as the teacher evaluates the needs of their class as a whole and individual students. A good teacher is balancing these needs and differentiating instruction for the different needs present in their classroom. Teachers also engage in formal evaluation of learners through regular report cards which are a mix of concrete data and subjective assessment based on contact with the learner.

 

Training Delivery

  • Conduct classroom and virtual training sessions
Facilitation is a core role of a classroom teacher. They are constantly standing in front of learners and delivering material. They also know how to manage groups of learners that are involved in a series of different activities. They are quite accomplished at working with one group or monitoring their activity while making sure that other groups of learners are engaged in their own learning. Teachers are masters of engagement and understand the role entertainment takes in good facilitation.

 

Learning Technologies

  • Experience with Captivate, Storyline, Lectora, and Microsoft applications
  • Design and develp eLearning modules
  • Experience with a LMS
Many teachers use a lot of technology in their classrooms. They may not have specifically used rapid design software, but have used other products such as Hyperstudio, iMovie, or web-based product to design or deliver learning activities. In my days as a teacher, I taught thinking skills and basic computing through the use of RoboLab, communication skills by teaching the students to capture, edit, and produce video to create public service announcements, and a variety of tools to create eLearning modules that guided learners to explore a topic and develop a variety of skills. Additionally, in today’s classroom, a teacher may have experience with a LMS such as Moodle or others. Teachers today can be very tech savvy and even if they don’t know the specific software program you use, they have likely used something similar.

 

Evaluating Learning Impact

  • Use metrics to evaluate learning programs
Teachers use a lot of data when measuring learning and students. They have data from classroom assessments which allow the teacher to evaluate specific students and identify issues with the instructional materials. Teachers also receives data from standardized tests which lets the teacher look at their students in relation to a greater population of learners. Additionally, the teacher has subjective data that has been collected as a part of individual coaching of a learner. Teachers are a great deal of experience working with and effectively using metrics to improve learning.

As you look at these four competencies, you can see that former teachers bring extensive experience designing and facilitating instruction. They have worked with a variety of metric, both creating the assessment to capture metric but also working with metrics that have been collected by other sources. Former teachers can also have extensive technology knowledge and while they may not have worked with the exact programs you want them to utilize, they have likely worked with very similar software technologies and may have used some technology that would be a great addition to your departments toolbox.

For myself, I was a huge technology enthusiast and was always looking at ways to use technology as one of the ways to best achieve the goals and objectives for my students. My love of technology and comfort with it led me down a path of designing and developing eLearning. While that is just one of my job functions, currently it is a focus and it is my roots in technology from my teaching experience that led to my success today.

Check back next week for part two of this series where we will look at four more of the competencies outlined by the ATD.

 

Customize it!

Everything these days is customized…your burger at fast food restaurants…your wedding vows…your new car and using variables and advanced actions in Adobe Captivate, so can your e-learning.

In a recent course I created on Interview skills I decided to include an interview simulations. In addition to the feedback that happened throughout the scenario, I decided to provide a summary of customized feedback at the end of the scenario.

 

Setting the Scene

I designed a scenario for the training that many managers would face, hiring a person for a counter sales position.

Question

User Decisions

The user then goes through the scenario, making decisions about actions to take and questions to ask. I attached the responses to variables using standard actions so that when a user chooses a specific answer it may add one to the variable.

Introduction

Receiving Feedback

At the end of the scenario, the user receives customized feedback on the interview they conducted. I was able to use a conditional action to evaluate the variables and based on the variables value, show certain feedback. This allows the feedback to be very specific to the choices the employee made.

Feedback

From a Technical Side

So for each decision that a user was going to make, I created a variable. When the employee clicks on a decision choice, it either activates a standard action that increments the variable by one or it does nothing, leaving the value of the variable alone. Clicking the choices also moves the scenario forward based on the decision made. At the end of the scenario, the user receives summary feedback. For the summary feedback section at the end of the scenario, I created invisible text boxes with different feedback for each of the major concepts that I wanted to give the employee feedback on. Most times there were two different feedback options, but for some there were more. Advanced Action ScreenUpon entry to the slide, I used a conditional action to evaluate the variables. For each variable, I set up the action to evaluate the value of the variable and based on that value, it would show a specific text box. For instance, if the value of the variable was 1, it would show text box A, else, it would show text box B.

 

This allowed me to provide customized feedback to each employee taking the course. I also allow them to go through the scenario repeatedly so it was important that I attached a standard action to my restart button that clears all the feedback and resets the value of all the variables back to 0.

If you are interested in creating some customized feedback Adobe Captivate’s variables and advanced actions are a great way to do this. If you would like more information about this process, reach out to me and I would be happy to help you.

 

 

Finding Inspiration: In New Tools

inspiration-design-ideas3754[1]Where do you find inspiration for your work? If you ask 100 people I suspect you would get many different answers. I find inspiration in a number of different places, but today I want to focus on finding it in new tools.

The beauty about a new tool is that it can inspire you to take another look and evaluate how you do something. Changes can come out of it, not only that utilize the new tool, but from the fresh look you are taking. Since a new tool changes your workflow, it becomes a point of new insight and inspiration, so take advantage of this and be inspired.

The Thinking My New Captivate Version Inspired

Two weeks my upgrade for Adobe Captivate 7 arrived. I had been working with 5.5 and so this gave me access to all the improvements and features of both Captivate 6 and 7. Let’s look at some of the inspiration it provided me:

  • Notes to build Engagement – One of the new features is the ability to take notes. I see this as a way to build course engagement. To have my learners interact more and take responsibility for the information in the course. In my previous courses, I have often wanted learners to hold information learned at the beginning to be used later on. Some of this is procedural and some of it is scenario context. I know my learners are not always sitting at a desk in a typical learning setting so in the past, for the scenario context information, I found myself having to provide it on screen later in the course when it was needed. The addition of course notes will allow my learners to collect this information on their own and use it when necessary and give them more control over this aspect.
  • Web and YouTube Interactions to add Enhanced Resources – Some of the new interactions of Captivate 7 are the ability to bring web pages or YouTube videos right into the course. This alleviates the need for learners to leave your course to have access to this information or having you embed them into the course, making the file (and course loading times) smaller. I see this as a way to connect my learners to more resources. I have avoided adding these kinds of things in the past but as new training initiatives for our department include product knowledge and soft skills training, outside resources become more important. I am inspired to keep an eye on that in future development and take advantage of existing resources right through my course. For example, when talking about a generator, I can easily bring in a YouTube video explaining generators done by one of our vendors. My course becomes more of a collection of resources framed by me instead of something I have to completely create.
  • Data Interactions to include more Exploration – Many of the interactions now available in Captivate were added in Captivate 6 (but are still new for me because I never had this version) and they are ripe with opportunities to add more exploratory options to learning. I see these as opportunity to make my courses even more exploratory in nature. Learners are provided with charts. diagrams, or images that allow them to take control over exploring and discovering information. Previously in order to create these experiences, it required my to use advanced interactions and variable to create these and I was having to design the framework myself. This limited the amount I could take advantage of for time and resource reasons. These new interactions will free me up to create these opportunities when appropriate without having to weigh them against development time and cost.

How My Current Project was Improved

Now I had just finished designing three lesson modules that were ready for development and I decided to do that in Captivate 7, while exploring the features and functions. Let me share with you a few of the ways it impacted the development of my current project:

  • Using Characters – My company does not subscribe to any image services and I either have to find free images at places like morguefile.com or I have to take them myself (fortunately I am a photography buff and have fairly good photography equipment and resources). I have developed a set of images of people engaging in different activities that I can draw of for my modules but I did not take them in front of a green screen so that i can remove the environment. The characters now available in captivate allowed me to replace some of the photos I would have used with characters that look and feel like they are a part of the slide as opposed to a photo added to the slide. This also allowed for some consistency in use and I will probably develop a few of the characters as standard “characters” in my training since they come in a wide variety of poses and expressions.
  • Interactions – Oh, how I have pined for some prebuilt interactions. I have been hacking together more complex interactions using variables and advanced interactions but having a set of prebuilt, smoothly operating interactions is a real time-saver. I was able to replace a few of my intended interactions with one of the ones included ion Captivate 7. I still left some of the interactions I had designed and intended, but where those offered provided an equivalent substitution, I made the change and saved myself a bunch of development time.
  • Themes – Recently I developed a new look for our courses. This had been focused on the lesson slides and interactions. With the new themes available, I was able to find a complimentary one to my new design that allowed me to fill in the gaps, most noticeably in my quiz slides. This became a timely enhancement and made a huge difference in the overall aesthetic of the course.

This is just a few of the ways this new tool has fueled my thinking and motivation. I am sure as I use and work with more of the features of this tool, I will be inspired further. And tools are just one of the ways to inspire your work. I plan to write about others in future posts.